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first_imgIn this Dec. 13, 1966, file photo, Tommy Nobis of the Atlanta Falcons, poses. (AP Photo/File) BOSTON (AP) — Atlanta Falcons linebacker Tommy Nobis seemed to transition easily into his post-playing career, landing a job as the manager of the team’s training camp hotel and rising through the franchise’s front office to vice president.For three more decades, the man who came to be known as “Mr. Falcon” never left football.And football never left him.“Growing up, I remember my mom having to call his secretary when he was going out to training camp to let them know what kind of mood he was in. And then vice versa,” his daughter, Devon Jackoniski, said in a recent interview with The Associated Press.“We were pretty uneasy growing up,” she said. “Although my dad had just some beautiful moments of being a wonderful man, emotionally he was so unstable it was just hard to get close to him.”Researchers have confirmed what Nobis’ family long suspected: He had the most severe form of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the degenerative brain disease linked to repetitive blows to the head that can cause the kind of violent moods they had grown accustomed to.And now, as the NFL world descends upon Atlanta for Sunday’s Super Bowl, it serves as a somber reminder of the impact that football can have on its players and those who love them.“That truly was my dad’s first love,” Jackoniski said. “He wasn’t born with a lot of money. They were from a blue-collar area. It gave my dad a lot of opportunities, so it’s kind of a bittersweet thing.“He told me before he became very ill he would never turn his back on football or do anything different. But he would educate kids a little different in the game,” Jackoniski said. “There’s something very wrong with slamming your head against a brick wall over and over and over again.”A two-way star at Texas whose No. 60 was retired by both the Falcons and the Longhorns, Nobis won the Maxwell Award as the best all-around player in college football and finished seventh in the 1965 Heisman Trophy voting, just ahead of Bob Griese and Steve Spurrier. In the Orange Bowl against Joe Namath and top-ranked Alabama, Nobis led a goal-line stand to preserve the Longhorns victory .He was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1966 NFL draft — the first ever selection by the brand new Atlanta Falcons franchise . Rookie of the year. Five Pro Bowl selections. But he never made the playoffs, with the upstart franchise posting only two winning records in his 11 seasons. And when the Falcons reached the Super Bowl two years ago, he was too far gone to understand what it meant.Dr. Ann McKee, the director of Boston University’s CTE center, said on Monday that Nobis had the most severe form of the disease, showing a “severe loss of neurons and large CTE lesions throughout the cerebral cortex.”The family was not surprised.“We knew there was going to be something wrong on his pathology report,” said Jackoniski, who is a physician’s assistant. “But it was shocking how a human being could still be alive with that little functioning brain.”Jackoniski was 2 when her father retired from the NFL, but football was never far from their life.Nobis spent three decades in the team’s front office, working in scouting, marketing, player development and corporate development. (He also ran a charity that provided job training for people with disabilities.)At home, there was more football.“It doesn’t matter the time of year, my dad could always find a football game on,” Jackoniski said. “That was basically our lives. When he retired, his only career was with the Falcons. We would go to all the Falcons games, whether we wanted to or not. That was who we were.”She remembered her father, who died in 2017 at the age of 74, as a humble man who was not very social, and yet a great public speaker. A prankster. Big Red. Huckleberry Finn with Muscles.He was beloved in Atlanta; Jackoniski said he would approach children with disabilities at restaurants, just to make them laugh.“That can be awkward for a lot of people, but it wasn’t to him. He could relate to a kid but not an adult,” she said. “When we were growing up, people would always come up to us and say, ‘Your dad is a saint.’ We would just sit there smiling, knowing that when we got home, the tide was going to turn.”With his family, Jackoniski said, Nobis was a disciplinarian. Aggressive. Intense. “We always said we had to walk around eggshells with my dad,” Jackoniski said.When her older brother, Tommy, decided he didn’t want to play football anymore, her father snapped. The incident drove a wedge between them, and kept Nobis from seeing any of his grandchildren for many of his later years.“He just became unhinged,” Jackoniski said. “We just thought that’s who my dad was.”Nine years ago, Nobis was supposed to give the eulogy at his father-in-law’s funeral. “My dad, who was the public speaker,” Jackoniski said. “It was totally garbled.”Afterward, in front of the extended family, Nobis snapped at her 2-year-old son. His rage was so frightening they thought about calling the police.“He was this caged animal that was just unleashed,” she said. “At that point we knew there was something wrong. Once he took it out to the public, we knew there was something horribly wrong with him.”The family tried to avoid triggers like noise or chaos, but Nobis would become increasingly rattled in public. There were restaurants he couldn’t return to because of his outbursts; he got out of a car at a bank drive-thru to yell at the teller for taking too long with the customer in front of him.“It became embarrassing,” Jackoniski said. “But it was scary, too. Toward the end my brother removed all the guns from his house, thankfully. I don’t know if he ever threatened to use a gun, but my brother had enough insight to do that.”CTE, which can only be diagnosed after death, has been found in more than 100 former NFL players, and in dozens more athletes and members of the military who have been exposed to repetitive head trauma. The disease can lead to memory loss, depression and even suicide.“When you see some of these guys going in for these tackles, I wish they would allow these guys to come into these houses where these CTE victims are living and see them living their lives, day to day,” Jackoniski said.“Do they really want their lives to be that way? Not only is it going to affect their lives, but it rips families apart, and it rips friends apart, and it is so destructive.”Although her children don’t play football, Jackoniski said they remain Falcons and Longhorns fans and are proud of the man who they were once kept away from for their own safety. And though connecting his behavior to CTE has helped the family understand Nobis’ struggle, it also made Jackoniski realize that she never knew what her father was actually like.“I don’t know that I ever saw my dad without showing signs of CTE, my entire life,” she said. “In hindsight, I think that was the saddest part of the news. His children never even knew who he was. My mom even may have not known.”Jackoniski said she doesn’t watch a lot of football any more, but she will watch the Super Bowl “just because I know it will be on in our house.” In an email follow-up to the telephone interview, she said she struggled to comprehend what the sport has meant to her family.“Football was my father’s life, the air he breathed and therefore the air we breathed,” she wrote. “It brought discipline and recklessness, self-worth and depression, strength and weakness, determination and fear, teamwork and destruction of relationships, competition and dissension, friendships and loneliness, strategy and brutal honesty, entertainment and subsistence.“In the end,” she said, “it brought humility in every sense of the word.”___For more AP NFL coverage: https://apnews.com/NFL and www.twitter.com/AP_NFLcenter_img In this Sept. 20, 2009, file photo, former Atlanta Falcons Pro Bowler Tommy Nobis is introduced along with other members of the 1966 inaugural team during halftime of an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers in Atlanta.  (AP Photo/John Amis, File)last_img read more

first_imgAdvertisement nxlNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsag5wWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E2wadu9( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) xksxWould you ever consider trying this?😱jprdCan your students do this? 🌚8yt1dRoller skating! Powered by Firework Free-agent guard Jamal Crawford said he’d be interested in signing with the Philadelphia 76ers ahead of the 2018-19 NBA season.Advertisement Crawford reportedly opted out of his contract with the Timberwolves in early May.Advertisement On Friday, Crawford told Brandon Robinson on Scoop B Radio (via Ashish Mathur of Amico Hoops) he would by “honored” to play in Philly:“I’ve always loved coach Brett Brown. I’ve been on record. I’ve been a fan of his for years. He just needed talent, and now he has that. He added Ben Simmons, I love his game. I love Jojo [Joel Embiid]. They’re both among my favorite players in the league to watch. Markelle [Fultz] is like a little brother to me. Obviously, he went to the University of Washington, and we talk every other day. J.J. Redick is like a brother to me, we’ve been through wars together, so there’s so many things to love about Philadelphia for sure.”Advertisement Crawford would serve as veteran depth on a young Sixers team, and they reportedly have some interest. Perhaps something will come of this and Crawford, who is surprisingly unsigned into August, will find his new home. Advertisementlast_img read more

Top honours for Izzy

first_imgBy JARROD POTTER AUGUST has been an amazing football month for Izzy Marsh. The Garfield football prodigy represented Victoria, helped…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

first_imgGalway United head to Buncrana this evening to take on Derry City in the Airtricity League. United are currently second from bottom but a win would see them move out of the relegation zone. Jesse Devers is out and Gavin Holohan will have his groin injury assessed before kick off at 7.45pm. Audio Playerhttps://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/sports.podcast/KEEGAN+OTL.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email Galway United manager Shane Keegan spoke to John Mulligan on Over The Linelast_img read more

first_imgSouthland Baseball Weekly Release (PDF)FRISCO, Texas – Houston Baptist junior right-hander Curtis Jones has been named the Southland Conference Pitcher of the Week and Lamar senior shortstop Sam Bumpers has been named the Southland Hitter of the Week, the league office announced Monday. Jones tossed his second complete game of the season in leading HBU to a 7-1 win over Southeastern Louisiana to clinch the series win. The junior from Cypress, Texas (Cypress Ranch H.S.), allowed just one run on six hits while striking out two hitters and not allowing a walk. Lion hitters only managed to notch a .200 batting average as Jones lowered his season ERA to 1.91, which ranks sixth in the conference. Jones also leads all starting pitchers with a 0.73 ERA in league play. With the win, Jones moved to 2-1 on the year. Each school’s sports information director nominates and votes for the players of the week, though is not permitted to vote for his own player. To receive honorable mention, a player must receive votes from 25 percent of the Southland sports information directors. Honorable mention for hitter of the week goes to Houston Baptist junior second baseman Josh Martinez and Stephen F. Austin senior shortstop Brett Thornell. Honorable mention for pitcher of the week goes to Northwestern State freshman right-hander Adam Oller, New Orleans junior right-hander Alex Smith and Stephen F. Austin junior right-hander Tyler Wiedenfeld. Bumpers had one the better hitting performances of the year in the series opener against McNeese State to help lead the Cardinals to the 8-7 win in 11 innings. The senior from Bourbonnais, Ill. (Bradley-Bourbonnais H.S.), went 7-for-7 with three home runs and a double against the Cowboys. Bumpers drove in five runs in the contest while scoring three times. He is just the third player in league history to record seven hits in a game and is the first Cardinal to ever accomplish that milestone. Bumpers also had a home run in the second game of the series and hit safely in all four of Lamar’s games. On the week, Bumpers hit .700 (14-for-20) with four home runs, two doubles, seven RBI and seven runs scored. He notched an impressive 1.400 slugging percentage while recording a .714 on-base percentage.last_img read more

first_imgThe HIV prevalence among women in the 30 to 34 age group showed an increase, from 39.6 percent in 2007 and 40.4 percent in 2008 to 41.5 percent in 2009. The department will observe this age group closely to assess what impact ARV treatment has. 12 November 2010 As in previous years, KwaZulu-Natal had the highest HIV prevalence, followed by Mpumalanga and Free State, with overall prevalence greater than 30 percent. The North West, Limpopo, Gauteng and Eastern Cape had prevalences of between 20 percent and 30 percent. The survey, released in Pretoria this week, shows that South Africa’s HIV prevalence has remained constant at around 29 percent over the past four years. Motsoaledi noted that KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and the Eastern Cape had the same socio-economic conditions when it came to HIV. “This is the most important group to provide evidence when monitoring new HIV infections,” Motsoaledi said. He added that it remained to be seen how far South Africa was from achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) in this age group – the MDG target for 2015 is a reduction by 25 percent, to an HIV prevalence rate of 17.3 percent. Motsoaledi acknowledged that while he was satisfied that the government had done everything possible with regards to HIV/Aids intervention on paper, he was concerned as to whether it was being implemented on the ground. Socio-economic factors “We are reviewing this,” he said. The report, presented by Motsoaledi on Thursday, showed that HIV prevalence remained constant among 15- to 24-year-old pregnant women, with 21.7 percent in 2009. This was the same as the figure in 2008, which was a decline of 0.4 percent from 22.1 percent in 2007. The Northern Cape and Western Cape were the only provinces that had HIV prevalence rates below 20 percent. While South Africa’s latest antenatal prevalence survey shows a stabilisation in the country’s HIV prevalence rate since 2006, Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi wants more to be done to implement the government’s plans to combat the epidemic. The 2009 National Antenatal Sentinel HIV and Syphilis Prevalence survey was conducted in all nine provinces and 52 health districts, where 337 841 pregnant women booking into 1 457 public antenatal clinics for the first time were sampled during October. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_imgPhoto: Boeing China will join Canada, the United Arab Emirates, Singapore and the US Federal Aviation Administration on an international panel reviewing the safety of the Boeing 737 MAX.The FAA said earlier this month that NASA would also join the international regulators on the Joint Authorities Technical Review team chaired by former US National Transportation Safety Board chairman Chris Hart.Reuters reported Tuesday that an official of Civil Aviation Administration of China had decided to send experts to be part of the FAA panel after being invited to join.Canada, the UAE and Singapore had already confirmed they would take part and an official told the news agency that regulators from Australia, EASA, Brazil, Indonesia and Ethiopia were also expected to join.READ Boeing cuts 737 productionThe cooperative approach is potentially good news for the manufacturer, which faces the threat of separate evaluations of the plane’s safety by regulators outside the US, most notably from Canada and Europe.The FAA said on April 2 that the JATR “ would conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the automated flight control system on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft.”READ our coverage of the Boeing crisis.“The JATR team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots’ interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed,’’ it said.The move comes after two 737 Max aircraft, one operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air and the other by Ethiopian Airlines, crashed within five months killing 346 people.Boeing has conceded that new software added to the MAX and called MCAS was involved in both crashes but questions have also been raised about the actions of the flight crews.The US manufacturer has developed a fix for the software and expressed confidence it will prevent a repeat of the crashes.A report into the March 10 Ethiopian crash showed the aircraft was subject to repeated nose down commands and that the pilots followed at least some of the procedures highlighted by Boeing and the FAA after the Lion Air crash to render MCAS ineffective.However, there are questions about the speed at which the plane was traveling and why the pilots appear to have turned back on the stabilizer trim system and re-enabled MCAS prior to nosediving into the ground.There had been suggestions Boeing was going to present its modified software to the FAA at the beginning of April but both the manufacturer and the regulator said at the time it would not be ready for several weeks.The FAA faces a number of investigations into the certification of the plane amid allegations it was too close to Boeing.last_img read more

first_img When Angel Vazquez emerged from his home on 21 September after Hurricane Maria had raged through the night, he saw a scene of utter devastation now familiar to all in Puerto Rico. Homes and buildings were damaged; trees and utility poles were down. Power, sanitation, and all communications were out, he soon discovered. Neighbors were already trying to clear the roads with chainsaws and machetes, but for Vazquez the most pressing need was to check on the Arecibo Observatory, the gargantuan radio telescope built into a depression in the island’s karst hills.Vazquez, head of telescope operations at the facility, got in his car and crept behind a bulldozer that was pushing through debris up the road to the observatory. The normally 20-minute journey took almost 2 hours. Once there, “I got a good surprise,” he says. The couple of dozen staff on site were all safe, and damage to the 54-year-old observatory was relatively slight—it was built with Cold War solidity partly for military research.But more than a month later, Arecibo is still waiting to resume normal operations. In the meantime, the telescope and its infrastructure have become the unlikely base for an ongoing relief effort for its staff and nearby communities. And in a painful irony, while the 110 employees put their own lives back together, the future of their observatory is in question. The National Science Foundation (NSF), which supplies most of Arecibo’s funding, wants to substantially scale down its contributions and has been looking for other backers. This week, the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, is discussing plans for the observatory’s future.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Once Vazquez had sized up the damage at the observatory, he headed back down the hill with dozens of phone numbers and messages for staff members’ families in the continental United States. By fortunate circumstance, Vazquez is a ham radio enthusiast; he had a generator and his antenna survived the storm. Soon he was passing on the numbers and messages to ham operators on the mainland, some of them former Arecibo staff, who made phone calls to anxious families and relayed messages back through Vazquez. He says that the makeshift communications system conveyed about 250 messages in the following days, in addition to reporting the status of the observatory to the institutions that manage it.Many local staff turned up for work the following day, 22 September, but it took more than a week for observatory officials to make sure all their employees were safe. Some had been trapped in villages entirely cut off by landslides, downed power lines, and toppled cell towers. “We had a phone tree, but no phones,” Deputy Director Joan Schmelz says.As soon as the safety of the laboratory was assured, Arecibo Director Francisco Cordova contacted the government’s center of emergency operations in San Juan to offer its facilities, including a pumped well, three 1-megawatt diesel generators, storage space, and a helipad. Soon federal relief agencies and the U.S. military were dropping off food and bottled water, which observatory staff delivered to surrounding communities. Arecibo has also been supplying tens of thousands of liters of water a day to local people who come to fill up containers. “We’re still doing this. The relief effort has been continuous,” Vazquez says.Meanwhile, the observatory itself has been inching back to life. A rudimentary internet connection was restored in late October, taking advantage of public Wi-Fi services—normally the bane of radio telescopes. “Usually I have to police these providers because of frequency interference. Now I had to go to them for help,” Vazquez says.But “the biggest obstacle to observations” is lack of power, says Nicholas White, senior vice president for science at the Universities Space Research Association in Columbia, Maryland, which helps manage Arecibo. Restoration of grid power may be weeks away. And though the observatory’s generators can support full operation, Schmelz says, “Diesel is in great demand on the island,” and airports and hospitals have priority. As it is, the observatory is burning 3000 liters of diesel a day simply to keep some equipment running, including the vital hydrogen maser frequency standard—recalibrating it after a shutdown could take a month, according to Schmelz.Researchers have been operating the telescope in a low-power mode called “drift scan,” in which it is left pointing in one direction, allowing the sky to drift past as Earth rotates. But turning on any of the telescope’s radars to study planets and Earth’s upper atmosphere, for example, is ruled out because it would double diesel consumption. Over the past week, with the diesel supply improving, staff have been conducting pointing checks—moving the 900-ton platform that steers the telescope’s focus—in the expectation that enough fuel will soon be available for full operation.While they cope with the chaos around them, staff are waiting anxiously to hear NSF’s decision on their fate. If no other organization offers to fill the funding gap, prospects look bleak. “Everyone would like to get past this whole process,” White says. “The uncertainty has gone on for a long time.” *Update, 8 November, 4:35 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify a quote from Joan Schmelz. By Daniel CleryNov. 7, 2017 , 5:45 PM Giant radio telescope lends a hand in Puerto Rico relief An Arecibo Observatory staffer greets a U.S. Coast Guard pilot ferrying food and water for delivery to nearby communities. PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS DAVID MICALLEF last_img read more

first_imgChelsea boss Lampard: Mourinho had a go after Man Utd defeatby Paul Vegas7 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard has revealed Jose Mourinho “had a little go” at him following their opening day defeat at Manchester United.The Blues got their campaign off to a miserable start with a 4-0 defeat at Old Trafford, which marked Lampard’s first competitive game at the helm.Speaking to talkSPORT, Lampard said: “With Jose we would have texts from time to time. We had some at the start of the season around the United game where he had a little go!” Lampard, who spent a period of time working for BT Sport, accepts that it is nothing personal.”It’s all good,” he added. “I’ve sat in the punditry chair for a year so I understand the need to say things so I’m certainly not going to bang on too much. In terms of him, yeah we have a relationship.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgJuventus concerned over Aaron Ramsey strugglesby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus management have concerns over Aaron Ramsey’s season start.The Wales international left Arsenal in the summer and moved to Turin on a free transfer.The Daily Mail says with just three starts across all competitions so far this season, Ramsey is just an added cost to the income statement and has not yet proved the value the Old Lady had hoped for.Juventus have, so far, not been satisfied with their summer investment.Since his injury as an Arsenal player away to Napoli in April in the Europa League, Ramsey has played just a handful of games. The Caerphilly-born midfielder is muscular yet fragile and at the age of 30, he finds rapid physical recovery difficult to achieve. Then there is a secondary layer to his struggles. It seems to those at the club that Ramsey has not understood the correct rhythm and demands of Italian style training. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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