Congress slow to embrace social-networking sites

first_imgFor those still unplugged, online social networks are kind of a cross between a college commons and a high school homeroom where you never get in trouble for passing notes. Friends link to other friends, “poke” them as a means of greeting, and update their “status” to inform buddies about their mood or thoughts at any given moment. They are also politically active places. On Facebook, for instance, company officials estimate that half the users have declared political leanings. And beyond straight party activism, they said, more than 1 million users have signed on to groups that promote causes – from saving Darfur and cutting taxes to ending global warming. Yet fewer than 100 members of Congress operate sites on Facebook, although the Palo Alto-based company has made it easy by creating pages for all federal officeholders. Even fewer use MySpace, which boasts nearly 100 million users. WASHINGTON – California Congressman Dana Rohrabacher was baffled when asked recently about his use of the popular online gathering site Facebook. “Faith book?” replied the Republican from Huntington Beach. Rohrabacher is hardly the only lawmaker oblivious to the social-networking craze. While presidential candidates have been making online buddies on such sites as MySpace and Facebook for years, analysts say members of Congress have been slower to hook up to the digital phenomenon than dial-up users in a power outage. “There’s a trickle-down effect that comes into play when we look at how legislators use technology. The presidential campaigns use the shiny new tools first,” said Julie Barko Germany, deputy director of the Institute for Politics, Democracy and the Internet. Moreover, many of those who do use the sites have done little more than post biographical data. “This is a new age,” said Rep. Hilda Solis, D-Whittier, who actively uses her MySpace page and is the only Southern California lawmaker with one of the sites. “I think more members are starting to use it, but a lot of officials are still not focused on how it can be an important tool,” she said. When a bill Solis wrote preserving the legacy of labor leader Cesar Chavez came up for a hearing in March, for example, Solis didn’t rely only on traditional press releases to get the word out. She turned to the more than 300 “friends” she had accumulated via MySpace and Facebook. Like wildfire, she said, information about the hearing spread via e-mail blasts and blogs. Soon, even anti-Chavez bloggers were opining about the future of the bill. “It helped mobilize our people, too,” Solis said of the rapid-fire opposition. “It’s an exciting way to talk to people across the country.” Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, is the only other Southland member who uses his Facebook page. Officials with the site said they created pages for all federal officeholders as a part of a strategic initiative to galvanize youth political activism with Rock the Vote – as well as to prevent the creation of fake pages that use lawmakers’ names. The organizers then gave logon data to the Republican and Democratic national parties. “We decided to put resources against it because we felt it would become important, and we were right,” said Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Chris Kelly, noting that in the past election, the largest growth in voter turnout was among 18- to 24-year-olds, the primary users of social-networking sites. Still, he said, when his company approached political organizations, many were unsure what to make of it. Even now, some don’t use their Web sites very effectively. Pages that have not yet been claimed by lawmakers sport an American flag in place of a photo and are operating on autopilot. Indeed, lawmakers have collected hundreds of “friends” – Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Sherman Oaks, has 66 and Rep. Elton Gallegly, R-Thousand Oaks, has 55 – without even being aware of it. Supporters such as Sylvia Wei, 19, of Thousand Oaks, who listed herself as a Gallegly backer because she agrees with the congressman’s tough position on illegal immigration. And Helene Sinnreich, who is from Ohio but lists herself as a supporter of Rep. Howard Berman, D-Van Nuys, because she is a lifelong Democrat and also friends with Berman’s daughter. Waxman said he started using Facebook at the behest of his tech-savvy staffers. “Many of the people who access it become a community of sorts,” he said. “I want to be part of the conversation.” Kat Barr, research director for Youth Voting Strategies, which works to boost political involvement among young people, called social networking “a hugely helpful medium” for local lawmakers. But she said the key is for lawmakers to figure out how to turn their online “friends” into voters – and ultimately into volunteers, donors and political organizers. “There’s a huge potential in reaching out to people in a big way. But it’s also important to combine that with substantive outreach,” she said. Social-networking experts noted that some members of Congress are using the sites in innovative ways. Rep. George Miller, D-Martinez, for example, has an application on his Facebook page called “Ask George,” on which he answers questions from members about the war in Iraq. North Dakota Democrat Rep. Earl Pomeroy started an online group called “Earl Jam” to stay connected with young voters. And House Speaker Nancy Pelosi posts content about Democrats’ doings on the Hill on YouTube almost daily. Overall, according to social-networking experts and political analysts, Democrats seem to be taking to the tool quicker than Republicans. Among the 87 House members on Facebook, for example, 36 are Republicans while 51 are Democrats. At the same time, Republican National Committee online strategist Cyrus Krohn noted that there is a “critical mass” of Republicans among users of social-networking sites. And, of course, not all Democrats are social-network savvy. Berman is one such lawmaker who has not touched his Facebook page – despite the fact that his daughter, Lindsey, works for Youth Voter Strategies, has linked herself as a “supporter” on her father’s page and has encouraged many of her friends to do the same. “It’s ironic, because he’s probably the best expert on copyright and patent reform,” Lindsey Berman said of her father, who serves as chairman of the House Judiciary subcommittee on Courts, the Internet and Intellectual Property. But, she added, “He also doesn’t have a BlackBerry.” Germany said it might take a while for local lawmakers to realize the potential of networking sites. “There’s a lot of political activity and online issue involvement,” she said. “But if you don’t see that, it looks like just another place to get a date.” lisa.friedman@langnews.com (202) 662-8731160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

LAUSD chief promises revolution

first_imgIn his first official back-to-school address to thousands of administrators, Brewer vowed a cultural revolution this year in the 708,000-student district. “Failure will no longer be an option at LAUSD,” he told nearly 2,000 principals, assistant principals and LAUSD administrators gathered at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Nearly 10 months after he took the helm of the nation’s second-largest school district, Brewer said new evaluation forms for administrators will take into account state testing performance, absentee rates and the number of ninth-graders moving to the 10th grade. And Brewer told teachers and administrators that despite the new benchmarks – and the difficulties ahead – they need to persevere. “When you feel like you want to give up, you look at a young child ? to give yourself inspiration. You go out and look at some of these young people who are struggling every day walking through gang gantlets to get to school to get an education and then you say to yourself, `I will never give up,”‘ Brewer said. “When I have a bad day, I go visit a school because I have to be reminded viscerally what I’m all about, why I left my comfort zone to come here.” In a district where accountability has never been institutionalized, Brewer said directors will visit schools every month to monitor progress. The new evaluation forms, which have the support of the administrators union, will be formally introduced next year, Brewer said, but administrators will be targeted on the standards this year. “I am going to come see you, the local district superintendents are going to come see you, the directors are going to come see you and when we come see you, we’re going to have a scorecard,” Brewer said. In his speech, Brewer eschewed notes and the lectern, and paced confidently on stage like a motivational speaker as his “8 Steps to Change” reform plan was projected on two jumbo-size screens. In a marked departure from predecessor Roy Romer’s style – which usually included cardboard charts of student test scores – Brewer forcefully prodded school leaders to establish a sense of urgency. He exhorted them to build their own teams, create a vision, communicate the vision, empower others to act, produce quick wins, not let up or give up and create a new culture. And he emphasized that each administrator will undergo professional development courses that will guide reform along with data, innovation, engaging parents and the community and ensuring student safety. The goal, he said, is to create an environment that nurtures teachers such as Jaime Escalante, who defied expectations and taught advanced math classes to poor students at Garfield High School. Actor Edward James Olmos was nominated for an Oscar for his portrayal of Escalante’s challenges and triumphs in the 1988 film “Stand and Deliver.” But Escalante resigned in 1991 – after 17 years at Garfield – to take a teaching post in the Sacramento City Unified School District. “All I know is that we have not recovered from that at Garfield. ? In this culture, we kill our savants. We have to stop that. That is a part of the cultural revolution that is going to happen under David Brewer,” he said. “We will not kill our savants. We will model them and benchmark what they’re doing and replicate what they’re doing.” State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell urged principals to continue to challenge students to higher achievement and to feel connected to their schools. “Our jobs have become more difficult because this is a new economy,” he said. “It’s a hyper-competitive global economy and it’s an economy that requires of all of us to have higher-level thinking skills and we need to impart that on our students.” Julie Korenstein, who has served on the school board for 20years and has heard numerous back-to-school addresses, complimented Brewer’s style of speech but questioned its content. She said professional development courses are costly and may not be necessary for all administrators. “I don’t know whether or not what he is suggesting or recommending, where the teeth is in it yet,” she said. “These are a lot of hardworking administrators who have worked at their schools for a long, long time. ? I’m not sure if we need wholesale retraining of every administrator in the district.” LAUSD spokeswoman Binti Harvey said Brewer will use existing funds to pay for the professional development, along with some corporate funding. For Jefferson High Assistant Principal Jose Avila, the message was clear: Focus on students and don’t deviate no matter how difficult it gets. “It was inspiring. I think it’s definitely the move that we need to make and the direction we need to take,” Avila said. “We have to focus on the child and every time that something becomes difficult, take a look at who our clients are – our children – and they’re the ones we’re here for. “They’re our customers and they’re the ones we have to serve.” naush.boghossian@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SPEECH: In a back-to-school address,thedistrict’ssuperintendent places emphasis on accountability. By Naush Boghossian STAFF WRITER Seeking to elevate performance at Los Angeles Unified schools, Superintendent David Brewer III said Friday that he will hold administrators accountable for the first time with new evaluations, dropout and test-score benchmarks, and districtwide reviews. last_img

Less violent crime in South Africa

first_img8 September 2011 The levels of “contact crime” in South Africa – crimes usually involving violence – decreased by 6.9% in 2010/11, Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said on Thursday, while adding that the fight was far from over. Releasing the country’s annual crime statistics in Pretoria on Thursday, Mthethwa said there was a decline in all types of “contact crime”, including murder, rape, assault with intent to do serious bodily harm, common assault, aggravated robbery and common robbery. Murder was down by 6.5% and sexual offences by 3.1%. Assault with intent to do serious bodily harm dropped by 4.5%, while robbery with aggravating circumstances was down by 12%. However, Mthethwa said the stats were still worrying. “Contact crime is an area of crime which by its nature leads to serious feelings of fear and insecurity, because it is this form of crime [with] which violence is normally associated.”Drug-related crime on the increase Noting the 10.2% increase in drug-related crimes in 2010/11, Mthethwa said the police, instead of focusing on arresting people in possession of drugs, would be mounting operations aimed at the leaders of drug syndicates. He said they would also be working with the Departments of Education and Social Development in addressing the challenge of affected children. “We also acknowledge that dealing with drugs is a global challenge that needs to be coordinated with our international counterparts.”Drunken driving on the increase Mthethwa said it seemed people were not taking the “don’t drink and drive” motto seriously, as drunken driving cases were up by 3.5% in 2010/11, following the previous year’s 10.6% increase. “We all have a duty to ensure that our roads are safe, and those who break the law will be severely punished.” Although the stats showed a general decrease in all crimes, Mthethwa said this was just a motivating factor for the police, and that the fight was far from over. “Victory against crime is now an achievable goal. However, for as long as young children are still under bondage of crime and drugs, for as long as businesses are robbed, for as long as women are abused and raped, for as long as South Africans are mugged and hijacked – none of us must rest.” Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Gunman “Nonchalantly” Opens Fire in Colorado Walmart; Kills Three

first_imgPolice in Colorado today were searching for a gunman who calmly walked into a Walmart in suburban Denver and opened fire with a handgun, randomly shooting at shoppers and store clerks, killing three people, before he fled. The suspect “nonchalantly” entered a Walmart in Thornton, Colorado, and opened fire a little after 6 p.m. local time on Wednesday and then walked out, got into a red four-door hatchback and drove away, Thornton Police Department spokesman Victor Aliva told reporters, citing witness accounts. “What we have determined is that it is random as of right now,” Aliva said. “As witnesses stated, the person came in and just shot toward a group.” Two men died at the scene of the shooting. A wounded woman was taken to a hospital where she died, he said. The shooter is a white man, who was wearing a black jacket, maroon shirt and blue jeans, Aliva said. There was no indication that the shooting was an act of terrorism as no one has claimed responsibility, he said. “We can’t rule anything out.”Thornton is city of about 120,000 people roughly 10 miles northeast of downtown Denver. A Walmart customer, Aaron Stephens, 44, of Thornton, told Reuters he was inside paying for groceries at a self-checkout stand when he heard gunshots and the sound of ricocheting bullets. “The employees started screaming and the customers started screaming” as people began to flee the store, he recounted. “I ran out, too, because I didn’t want to get shot.” Stephens said he did not see where the shooting had come from and did not see anyone struck by bullets. Local NBC television affiliate 9NEWS reported that a woman whose son was in the Walmart had told her that he had heard about 30 gunshots and was still inside. A video posted on Twitter showed the Walmart, which is in a large complex of big-box stores and other retail outlets adjacent to U.S. Interstate 25, apparently empty except for police officers with guns drawn.   [Source: Yahoo! News]UPDATE: 12:00 PM: The Thornton Police Department said on Twitter that Scott Ostrem, 47, who authorities said randomly opened fire on Wednesday, had been taken into custody but did not immediately give details. Authorities had earlier released a surveillance camera photograph of a middle-aged white man wearing a black jacket and blue jeans. They also published a photo of the red four-door hatchback he was believed to have fled in. [Source: MSN News]- Sponsor – Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Analytics and Business Intelligence: BI Platforms Target Skills Gap with AI and Sophisticated Self-Serve Analytics

first_imgGartner recommends businesses begin looking past just analytics dashboards and standard visualizations when using Business Intelligence (BI).  As the market matures, software is becomming smarter, more scalable, and able to support complex analysis and data models, but delivered in a more easily human consumable way.Gartner expects that within two years, 90 percent of BI platforms will use artificial intelligence (AI).  Half of all BI queries will be natural-language or voice-based queries.  Improvements in BI will enable automated advanced analytics and visual-based data discovery.  These changes will also allow the number of BI users to increase substantially.The number of “citizen data scientists” within organizations is expected to grow by a factor of five over the next two years.  These “citizens” typically don’t have formal training in data science and statistics, but new features added to analytics packages make the software increasingly accessible to these lay users.The Gartner report found that “for the small, but growing, group of data-minded users who want to go beyond visualizing data, modern A&BI platforms have begun to offer more sophisticated analytic techniques, but packaged for self-service use. This capability, called Advanced Analytics for Citizen Data Scientists, is becoming of increased importance as organizations become more data-centered.last_img read more

Giant radio telescope lends a hand in Puerto Rico relief

first_img When Angel Vazquez emerged from his home on 21 September after Hurricane Maria had raged through the night, he saw a scene of utter devastation now familiar to all in Puerto Rico. Homes and buildings were damaged; trees and utility poles were down. Power, sanitation, and all communications were out, he soon discovered. Neighbors were already trying to clear the roads with chainsaws and machetes, but for Vazquez the most pressing need was to check on the Arecibo Observatory, the gargantuan radio telescope built into a depression in the island’s karst hills.Vazquez, head of telescope operations at the facility, got in his car and crept behind a bulldozer that was pushing through debris up the road to the observatory. The normally 20-minute journey took almost 2 hours. Once there, “I got a good surprise,” he says. The couple of dozen staff on site were all safe, and damage to the 54-year-old observatory was relatively slight—it was built with Cold War solidity partly for military research.But more than a month later, Arecibo is still waiting to resume normal operations. In the meantime, the telescope and its infrastructure have become the unlikely base for an ongoing relief effort for its staff and nearby communities. And in a painful irony, while the 110 employees put their own lives back together, the future of their observatory is in question. The National Science Foundation (NSF), which supplies most of Arecibo’s funding, wants to substantially scale down its contributions and has been looking for other backers. This week, the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, is discussing plans for the observatory’s future.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Once Vazquez had sized up the damage at the observatory, he headed back down the hill with dozens of phone numbers and messages for staff members’ families in the continental United States. By fortunate circumstance, Vazquez is a ham radio enthusiast; he had a generator and his antenna survived the storm. Soon he was passing on the numbers and messages to ham operators on the mainland, some of them former Arecibo staff, who made phone calls to anxious families and relayed messages back through Vazquez. He says that the makeshift communications system conveyed about 250 messages in the following days, in addition to reporting the status of the observatory to the institutions that manage it.Many local staff turned up for work the following day, 22 September, but it took more than a week for observatory officials to make sure all their employees were safe. Some had been trapped in villages entirely cut off by landslides, downed power lines, and toppled cell towers. “We had a phone tree, but no phones,” Deputy Director Joan Schmelz says.As soon as the safety of the laboratory was assured, Arecibo Director Francisco Cordova contacted the government’s center of emergency operations in San Juan to offer its facilities, including a pumped well, three 1-megawatt diesel generators, storage space, and a helipad. Soon federal relief agencies and the U.S. military were dropping off food and bottled water, which observatory staff delivered to surrounding communities. Arecibo has also been supplying tens of thousands of liters of water a day to local people who come to fill up containers. “We’re still doing this. The relief effort has been continuous,” Vazquez says.Meanwhile, the observatory itself has been inching back to life. A rudimentary internet connection was restored in late October, taking advantage of public Wi-Fi services—normally the bane of radio telescopes. “Usually I have to police these providers because of frequency interference. Now I had to go to them for help,” Vazquez says.But “the biggest obstacle to observations” is lack of power, says Nicholas White, senior vice president for science at the Universities Space Research Association in Columbia, Maryland, which helps manage Arecibo. Restoration of grid power may be weeks away. And though the observatory’s generators can support full operation, Schmelz says, “Diesel is in great demand on the island,” and airports and hospitals have priority. As it is, the observatory is burning 3000 liters of diesel a day simply to keep some equipment running, including the vital hydrogen maser frequency standard—recalibrating it after a shutdown could take a month, according to Schmelz.Researchers have been operating the telescope in a low-power mode called “drift scan,” in which it is left pointing in one direction, allowing the sky to drift past as Earth rotates. But turning on any of the telescope’s radars to study planets and Earth’s upper atmosphere, for example, is ruled out because it would double diesel consumption. Over the past week, with the diesel supply improving, staff have been conducting pointing checks—moving the 900-ton platform that steers the telescope’s focus—in the expectation that enough fuel will soon be available for full operation.While they cope with the chaos around them, staff are waiting anxiously to hear NSF’s decision on their fate. If no other organization offers to fill the funding gap, prospects look bleak. “Everyone would like to get past this whole process,” White says. “The uncertainty has gone on for a long time.” *Update, 8 November, 4:35 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify a quote from Joan Schmelz. By Daniel CleryNov. 7, 2017 , 5:45 PM Giant radio telescope lends a hand in Puerto Rico relief An Arecibo Observatory staffer greets a U.S. Coast Guard pilot ferrying food and water for delivery to nearby communities. PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS DAVID MICALLEF last_img read more

Beer-slinging robot predicts whether you’ll give that brew a thumbs up—or down

first_img To make predictions, the researchers used two types of data. First, as RoboBEER poured, it measured 15 beer attributes including bubble size, beer color, gas release, and foam height and stability. Second, people’s faces were videotaped as they watched the beer videos. Artificial intelligence (AI) analyzed the videos to measure biometric factors such as pupil dilation, heart rate, and emotional expression. For each viewer, the researchers fed 28 pieces of RoboBEER and biometric data into a neural network—another AI algorithm—to see whether the data correlated with the person’s conscious ratings.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The neural network could predict whether someone liked a beer’s foam height with about 80% accuracy, the team reports in Food Control. In unpublished work, the team has found that an AI with just the RoboBEER data can predict a beer’s likability—as rated in sipping sessions by consumers or even connoisseurs—with about 90% accuracy. And it doesn’t need a designated driver. iStock.com/doug4537 By Matthew HutsonMay. 30, 2018 , 9:45 AM As we pawn more and more jobs off on robots, there are a few you’d think we’d keep for ourselves, like beer taster. But brewers often need an automated way to ensure product quality, and a research team in Australia has developed a cheap method to help them. Their latest study assesses a freshly poured beer’s frothy top. Why focus on the bubbles? Because foam affects people’s enjoyment of beer and sparkling wine even more than taste and aroma do.To gauge people’s reactions to beer foam, the researchers needed a consistent way to produce the foam, so they employed RoboBEER, a robot they’d previously built out of Lego pieces that pours beer from bottles into a glass. They showed videos of these robo-pours to people and asked them several questions about how they liked the height and stability of the foam, as well as the beer’s clarity and overall perceived quality. The goal was to be able to show people a video and predict these ratings without a long—or any—questionnaire, and without having to serve any actual beer, which slows the evaluation process even more. Beer-slinging robot predicts whether you’ll give that brew a thumbs up—or downlast_img read more

In The Spotlight – Willie Bishop

first_imgIn the forty-fourth edition of In The Spotlight, Australian Men’s Open player, Willie Bishop, speaks about what it means to represent Australia at the 2011 World Cup, and his career highlights so far. Name: Willie BishopNickname: Willie BAge: 29Affiliate: ManlyOccupation: Personal TrainerPosition: LinkDebut for Australia: 2011 Touch World CupCareer highlights so far: Australian IRB Rugby Sevens 2007 – 2010  Australian Open Men’s How you got involved in Touch Football: New Zealand Juniors RepFavourite player: Peter WaltersWhat does it mean to you to be representing Australia at the 2011 World Cup? When I was young I always thought I’d represent New Zealand. Times have changed as my family and I jumped ship and moved to Australia. I’m grateful for the opportunity I’ve been given to play for Australia, although being a Kiwi, New Zealand is where my heart is but I represent for Australia 100%. Biggest influence on your Touch Football career:  Peter WaltersFavourite sporting moment: Representing Australia in the IRB Rugby Sevens Team in Wellington New ZealandWhat do you know about Scotland:  Travelled there a few times on the IRB Rugby Sevens circuit, pretty cold, gets dark real late and the Edinburgh Castle’s pretty crazy.Any superstitions:  NoneFunniest Australian teammate: Jonathan PalauFavourite quote:  “It’s nice to be important but it’s more important to be nice.”Any travel plans for after World Cup: None, expecting another baby.With just one week left until the 2011 Federation of International Touch World Cup, be sure to be regularly visiting the Touch Football Australia website to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information. Don’t forget to become a fan of Touch Football Australia on Facebook and Twitter in the lead up to the 2011 World Cup to find out all you need to know about Australia’s World Cup campaign: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Touch-Football-Australia/384949403384 www.twitter.com/touchfootyauslast_img read more

10 months agoMan City midfielder Bernardo Silva: Sergio Conceicao would be success in England

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City midfielder Bernardo Silva: Sergio Conceicao would be success in Englandby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City midfielder Bernardo Silva says Porto coach Sergio Conceicao would be a success in England.Bernardo insists the impact of Portuguese managers in the Premier League is a sure sign Conceicao would impress.He told O Jogo: “The Portuguese coaches are very strong tactically. Sérgio Conceição already did a great job in France in Nantes – I think he did. “There would be room in England. (Jose) Mourinho left, but we have Marco Silva (Everton) and Nuno Espírito Santo (Wolves).”Bernardo also spoke of former AS Monaco coach Leonardo Jardim.”I was really sorry (about his sacking). I talked to Mr. Jardim at the time, but it’s a club decision. He lost a lot of the champion players two years ago, but Jardim gave a lot to the club. Monaco supporters are grateful he gave them a title they had not won for a long time.” last_img read more

7 days agoChelsea boss Lampard: Mourinho had a go after Man Utd defeat

first_imgChelsea boss Lampard: Mourinho had a go after Man Utd defeatby Paul Vegas7 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard has revealed Jose Mourinho “had a little go” at him following their opening day defeat at Manchester United.The Blues got their campaign off to a miserable start with a 4-0 defeat at Old Trafford, which marked Lampard’s first competitive game at the helm.Speaking to talkSPORT, Lampard said: “With Jose we would have texts from time to time. We had some at the start of the season around the United game where he had a little go!” Lampard, who spent a period of time working for BT Sport, accepts that it is nothing personal.”It’s all good,” he added. “I’ve sat in the punditry chair for a year so I understand the need to say things so I’m certainly not going to bang on too much. In terms of him, yeah we have a relationship.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more