Updated: United States adopts major chemical safety overhaul

first_img“While this is a compromise bill, it is a long overdue step forward in protecting families and communities from toxic chemicals,” said Representative Frank Pallone Jr. (D–NJ), top Democrat on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.Numerous fixesBoth environmentalists and industry have long agreed that the TSCA, originally passed in 1976, has numerous flaws. It includes legal barriers, for example, that essentially prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from acquiring toxicity data on chemicals and imposing new restrictions on them—even on highly toxic substances such as asbestos. Critics say the current legislation also favors economic concerns over scientific findings, and has led to thousands of chemicals entering the market without adequate health and safety oversight.The reform bill seeks to fix a number of these flaws. It aims to make chemical safety reviews purely science-based, by eliminating a long-time requirement that EPA weigh regulatory costs in the safety review process. It also repeals a long-time requirement that EPA select the “least burdensome” method of regulating a toxic substance. And the bill would require EPA to deem a new chemical safe before it could enter the marketplace; under current law, a chemical can enter the marketplace unless EPA deems it unsafe within a certain time period.The bill would also make it easier for EPA to order chemical companies to generate any toxicity data that the agency needs to inform its reviews; under current law, EPA can only order these data by going through a lengthy rulemaking process that often ends up mired in litigation. And the bill would require EPA to take tougher action on persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic chemicals, and ensure that chemicals are safe for vulnerable groups such as infants, seniors, and chemical workers.Animal protection and animal rights groups hailed another provision that aims to reduce EPA and chemical companies’ use of animal-based toxicity testing methods. It would task EPA with using non–animal-based methods “to the extent practicable,” and the agency would have to devise a plan to research, develop, and eventually use more nonanimal methods—including computational modeling, high-throughput screening, and cell-culture testing.The bill also includes a measure known as Trevor’s law that encourages federal agencies to study “cancer clusters”—areas that appear to have unusually high numbers of cancer cases that may be linked to a shared environmental cause. The Society of Toxicology in Reston, Virginia, although praising the bill, expressed some concern about including the cancer-cluster measure and other topic- or chemical-specific language in the bill. Doing so “detracts from the wider range of priority chemical-specific or analytical issues that, as toxicologists, we address every day,” society President John Morris said in a 23 May letter.Rocky historyThe TSCA reform bill is the result of years of negotiations involving lawmakers in both parties and a wide range of stakeholders. Many previous efforts to overhaul the TSCA failed after lawmakers couldn’t strike a consensus among competing interest groups, such as chemical companies and environmental groups. The current effort succeeded, however, despite the toxic political climate in Washington, D.C., and a government divided between a Democratic-held White House and Republican-held Congress.To arrive at the current bill, the House and Senate first approved their own bipartisan—but widely different—versions of TSCA reform. Then, lawmakers spent months negotiating a compromise between the chambers.It wasn’t clear for instance, whether the animal testing provisions—which were in the Senate bill, but not the House’s—would ultimately survive. “But the fact that we are now going to severely restrict the unnecessary cruelty to animals is something that I’m very proud that the leadership helped preserve,” Senator Cory Booker (D–NJ), a proponent of the language, told reporters outside the U.S. Capitol on 19 May in announcing his support of the bill.A much bigger sticking point was concern, voiced by many liberal Democrats and environmental groups, that the legislation would weaken states’ ability to issue their own chemical regulations. Senator Barbara Boxer (D–CA), the top Democrat on the Senate environment panel, had argued especially forcefully against language in the Senate bill that would have kept existing state chemical regulations on the books, but reduced the states’ ability to issue new regulations in the future.But Boxer ultimately supported the final compromise. The final bill is far from perfect on that issue, but it’s better than current law, she said in announcing she would support the reform measure. “What a battle that was,” she said. “Well, we no longer have that battle.”Not all lawmakers were won over. As the House voted 403 to 12 to approve the reform measure, Representative Paul Tonko (D–NY) cited the state preemption provisions as one reason he was voting against the bill. He was one of just nine House Democrats to oppose the bill; three House Republicans also voted against it.The reform measure led to splits among interest groups. Some environmental and health groups, such as the Breast Cancer Fund, have opposed it, whereas still others, such as the Natural Resources Defense Council, were noncommittal. But many industry groups and some environmental groups support the final product.And Senator Bernie Sanders (D–VT), who is seeking the Democratic Party’s nomination for president, sees both good and bad in the bill, but said that the preemption language would prevent his state from “going above and beyond” federal levels of action. “That makes no sense … federal chemical regulations should be a floor, not a ceiling,” Sanders said in a statement.*Update, 8 June, 10:30 a.m.: This item has been updated to reflect the final Senate vote.*Update, 26 May, 2:20 p.m.: This item has been updated to reflect current information on the timing of the Senate vote. The U.S. Senate yesterday unanimously approved a major overhaul of the nation’s primary chemical safety law—marking one of the last steps in a decades-long reform effort. The House of Representatives on 24 May overwhelmingly approved the rewrite of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), which governs how industrial chemicals are tested and regulated. The legislation now moves to President Barack Obama for signing.The measure—H.R. 2576, named for the late Senator Frank Lautenberg (D–NJ), a long-time TSCA reform champion—is perhaps the most far-reaching and influential environmental statute passed by Congress since the body updated the Clean Air Act in 1990. The measure aims to make chemical safety reviews more science-based, and includes provisions designed to reduce the use of animals in chemical testing and promote the study of so-called cancer clusters.“The end result … is a vast improvement over current law,” said Representative John Shimkus (R–IL), who co-sponsored the House bill, on the House floor. The bill, he added, is “a careful compromise that’s good for consumers, good for jobs, and good for the environment.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Panel’s advice on cancer risk from hot drinks is hard to swallow

first_imgHere’s what is going on. The 1991 verdict was based on much less data than are available today. Since then, hundreds of new studies on the effects of coffee have been published, says Rudolf Kaaks, an epidemiologist at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg. Many of these were cohort studies, in which healthy people are followed over years until some of them develop a disease. Such studies are generally considered to provide better evidence than case-control studies, which formed the basis for the 1991 classification.The review panel also took great care this time to exclude any results that might be explained by confounding factors, says Kaaks, for example, the fact that people who drink a lot of coffee are also more likely to smoke. Overall, the studies showed that drinking coffee does not increase the risk for pancreatic, prostate, or female breast cancer, explained the panel’s leader, Dana Loomis, at a press conference today in Lyon. It may even reduce the risk for liver cancer, Loomis said, adding that the evidence for most other cancer types is inconclusive. “In other words, we should not be worried about drinking coffee because of any possible risk of cancer,” says Paul Pharoah, a cancer epidemiologist at Cambridge.Much less is known about the effects of drinks consumed at temperatures above 65°C. But what data there are suggests they can cause cancer of the esophagus. The link is plausible, says Kaaks, who has worked at IARC in the past, because scalding hot water can cause inflammation, which is known to increase cancer risk. These hot drinks now join red meat, shift work, and dozens of chemicals in category 2A (probably carcinogenic) of the IARC classification system.But there are important caveats. “This finding is of limited relevance to people in the U.K. or USA, as it is very uncommon for people here to drink tea [or coffee] at temperatures defined by IARC as very hot,” Pharoah says. Even for those living in China, Iran, and parts of South America, where tea is traditionally drunk very hot, it is unclear how big a risk hot drinks pose. Asked to quantify the risk, Loomis said, “we cannot put a number on this at the moment.”Despite sending those mixed messages, scientists still have something of value to share, Kaaks says. “I think it’s okay to tell the public: Don’t drink your tea too hot,” he counsels. He figures that advice could benefit some people, and it’s unlikely to cause any harm. First, the good news: The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), headquartered in Lyon, France, is letting coffee off the hook after having classified it as “possibly carcinogenic” in 1991. It is now officially in the category “not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity.”But here’s the bad news: IARC experts have also concluded that consuming very hot beverages can probably cause cancer of the esophagus. How big a risk that poses, however, is unclear.Confused? Join the crowd. The two verdicts, announced today by an expert panel at an agency that is part of the World Health Organization, show the limits of such blanket yes-or-no decisions on whether something causes cancer. Such an announcement is “interesting for science but does not provide the information for making decisions, either policy or individuals,” says David Spiegelhalter, a statistician at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Milky Way’s superfast stars may have been fired out of a nearby galaxy

first_imgMilky Way’s superfast stars may have been fired out of a nearby galaxy By Daniel CleryJul. 4, 2017 , 7:00 PM A small number of stars moving so fast they’ll eventually escape the Milky Way may not come from our galaxy at all, a new study reveals. Until now, scientists have largely believed that such hypervelocity stars originate when binary stars get torn apart by the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which consumes one star and flings the other away at incredible speeds. There are alternative scenarios, but none explains why most of the 20 or so hypervelocity stars found so far are all in the same area of sky, in the Leo and Sextans constellations. Now, a team of astronomers has used position and velocity data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as well as computer simulations of stellar evolution in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC, pictured above), a small satellite galaxy near the Milky Way, to show that these speeding stars may come from there. Lower velocity runaway stars can be produced when one half of a binary pair explodes as a supernova, blasting its partner away. Such an event in the LMC, which has 10% of the Milky Way’s mass, could easily eject it from the satellite galaxy altogether. And because the LMC is orbiting the Milky Way at nearly 400 kilometers per second, a star ejected from it could be moving faster than the 500 kilometers per second that makes it a hypervelocity star in the Milky Way. As the team report today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and at the U.K. National Astronomy Meeting in Hull, most of the known hypervelocity stars have trajectories that would fit this scenario. Confirmation will hopefully come next year when Europe’s star-mapping satellite Gaia publishes its full catalog: The team predicts it should find more hypervelocity stars along the past and future orbit of the LMC.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Podcast: Cosmic rays, color words, and sleeping jellyfish

first_img This week we hear stories on animal hoarding, how different languages have different numbers of colors, and how to tell a wakeful jellyfish from a sleeping one with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic, Brice Russ, and Sarah Crespi.  Andrew Wagner talks to Karl-Heinz Kampert about a long-term study of the cosmic rays blasting our planet. After analyzing 30,000 high-energy rays, it turns out some are coming from outside the Milky Way.  Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image: Doug Letterman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Doug Letterman/Flickr CC by 2.0 last_img read more

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Giant radio telescope lends a hand in Puerto Rico relief

first_img When Angel Vazquez emerged from his home on 21 September after Hurricane Maria had raged through the night, he saw a scene of utter devastation now familiar to all in Puerto Rico. Homes and buildings were damaged; trees and utility poles were down. Power, sanitation, and all communications were out, he soon discovered. Neighbors were already trying to clear the roads with chainsaws and machetes, but for Vazquez the most pressing need was to check on the Arecibo Observatory, the gargantuan radio telescope built into a depression in the island’s karst hills.Vazquez, head of telescope operations at the facility, got in his car and crept behind a bulldozer that was pushing through debris up the road to the observatory. The normally 20-minute journey took almost 2 hours. Once there, “I got a good surprise,” he says. The couple of dozen staff on site were all safe, and damage to the 54-year-old observatory was relatively slight—it was built with Cold War solidity partly for military research.But more than a month later, Arecibo is still waiting to resume normal operations. In the meantime, the telescope and its infrastructure have become the unlikely base for an ongoing relief effort for its staff and nearby communities. And in a painful irony, while the 110 employees put their own lives back together, the future of their observatory is in question. The National Science Foundation (NSF), which supplies most of Arecibo’s funding, wants to substantially scale down its contributions and has been looking for other backers. This week, the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, is discussing plans for the observatory’s future.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Once Vazquez had sized up the damage at the observatory, he headed back down the hill with dozens of phone numbers and messages for staff members’ families in the continental United States. By fortunate circumstance, Vazquez is a ham radio enthusiast; he had a generator and his antenna survived the storm. Soon he was passing on the numbers and messages to ham operators on the mainland, some of them former Arecibo staff, who made phone calls to anxious families and relayed messages back through Vazquez. He says that the makeshift communications system conveyed about 250 messages in the following days, in addition to reporting the status of the observatory to the institutions that manage it.Many local staff turned up for work the following day, 22 September, but it took more than a week for observatory officials to make sure all their employees were safe. Some had been trapped in villages entirely cut off by landslides, downed power lines, and toppled cell towers. “We had a phone tree, but no phones,” Deputy Director Joan Schmelz says.As soon as the safety of the laboratory was assured, Arecibo Director Francisco Cordova contacted the government’s center of emergency operations in San Juan to offer its facilities, including a pumped well, three 1-megawatt diesel generators, storage space, and a helipad. Soon federal relief agencies and the U.S. military were dropping off food and bottled water, which observatory staff delivered to surrounding communities. Arecibo has also been supplying tens of thousands of liters of water a day to local people who come to fill up containers. “We’re still doing this. The relief effort has been continuous,” Vazquez says.Meanwhile, the observatory itself has been inching back to life. A rudimentary internet connection was restored in late October, taking advantage of public Wi-Fi services—normally the bane of radio telescopes. “Usually I have to police these providers because of frequency interference. Now I had to go to them for help,” Vazquez says.But “the biggest obstacle to observations” is lack of power, says Nicholas White, senior vice president for science at the Universities Space Research Association in Columbia, Maryland, which helps manage Arecibo. Restoration of grid power may be weeks away. And though the observatory’s generators can support full operation, Schmelz says, “Diesel is in great demand on the island,” and airports and hospitals have priority. As it is, the observatory is burning 3000 liters of diesel a day simply to keep some equipment running, including the vital hydrogen maser frequency standard—recalibrating it after a shutdown could take a month, according to Schmelz.Researchers have been operating the telescope in a low-power mode called “drift scan,” in which it is left pointing in one direction, allowing the sky to drift past as Earth rotates. But turning on any of the telescope’s radars to study planets and Earth’s upper atmosphere, for example, is ruled out because it would double diesel consumption. Over the past week, with the diesel supply improving, staff have been conducting pointing checks—moving the 900-ton platform that steers the telescope’s focus—in the expectation that enough fuel will soon be available for full operation.While they cope with the chaos around them, staff are waiting anxiously to hear NSF’s decision on their fate. If no other organization offers to fill the funding gap, prospects look bleak. “Everyone would like to get past this whole process,” White says. “The uncertainty has gone on for a long time.” *Update, 8 November, 4:35 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify a quote from Joan Schmelz. By Daniel CleryNov. 7, 2017 , 5:45 PM Giant radio telescope lends a hand in Puerto Rico relief An Arecibo Observatory staffer greets a U.S. Coast Guard pilot ferrying food and water for delivery to nearby communities. PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS DAVID MICALLEF last_img read more

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High-speed cameras reveal how hummingbirds can turn on a dime

first_imgHigh-speed cameras reveal how hummingbirds can turn on a dime Hummingbirds are the fighter pilots of the avian world, diving and weaving at speeds of up to 55 kilometers per hour—then turning on a dime to hover midair, wings frantically beating, as they refuel on nectar. Now, through herculean efforts, researchers are one step closer to figuring out what makes the animals so nimble. The new work not only helps explain their complex choreography, but it may also lead to more maneuverable robots and drones.Biologists have clocked how fast hummingbirds can fly and how long they can hover, but maneuverability—all that zipping back and forth—is “notoriously difficult to study,” says Peter Wainwright, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California (UC), Davis, who was not part of the new work. That’s because “it involves a complicated set of possible movements, and it’s very spontaneous.”That didn’t stop Paolo Segre, then a graduate student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. He decided to try by filming hummingbirds in the wild, which are less inhibited about flying than their captive counterparts. To prepare, he spent the better part of a year perfecting and miniaturizing a four-camera, computer-coordinated system for high-speed filming.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Two months later, Segre was in Peru. He and his team hiked up mountains and crashed through jungles to find the perfect site. Once they set up camp, they constructed a large cage outfitted with the solar-powered camera system and started testing their hummingbirds, one by one. The researchers filmed each bird for about 30 minutes as it flitted between perches and visited a nectar-feeding station inside. Then they let the bird go and repeated the process. Segre and his team set up stations in three other locations: the Ecuadorian Andes, and high- and low-elevation camps in Costa Rica.Getting the data wasn’t easy. In Peru, the team’s testing site was swarmed with army ants for 2 days straight. In Costa Rica, Segre and his colleagues had to wade across crocodile-infested waters—at night—in the middle of a lightning storm. “We were mostly terrified by the lightning,” recalls Segre, now an ecophysiologist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The scientists eventually made videos of 207 birds belonging to 25 species.Once they had the data, Segre’s labmate, postdoc Roslyn Dakin, now at the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center in Washington, D.C., developed sophisticated software with her colleagues to analyze them. Because there were four cameras, the researchers could reconstruct the flight pattern of each bird in three dimensions, measuring the number of times it accelerated, decelerated, turned, rolled, soared, or dove, among other maneuvers. Each of those simple moves repeated and combined into predictable patterns. “More complex maneuvers were made up of sequences of simpler maneuvers,” Segre explains.When the researchers compared flight patterns among species, they found that each one tended to stick to the maneuvers it was best at (something especially true of turns). But they were surprised to find that heavier hummingbird species were generally better at accelerating and making tight turns. Based on studies in birds and bats, the team had expected the exact opposite. “But larger hummingbird species were actually more maneuverable,” Dakin says. The reason: Those heftier hummers had relatively bigger muscles and wings than smaller species, she and her colleagues report today in Science.Several other trends emerged. Maneuvering behaviors that differed from species to species generally came down to structural and physiological traits such as wing size, wing surface area, weight, and muscle mass. Finally, when the team grouped the birds based on their flight patterns, they found the clusters reflected the hummingbird family tree: More closely related species had similar flight patterns.Dakin says this new maneuverability “framework” could help roboticists understand how to tweak their flyers to be less clumsy and fragile. Particularly useful is hummingbirds’ ability to generate rapid wing movements, which helps with agility, says Andrew Biewener, a biomechanist at Harvard University. As a result, adds Robert Dudley, an organismal biologist at UC Berkeley, even more engineers are now studying animal flight than biologists. By Elizabeth PennisiFeb. 8, 2018 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

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Beer-slinging robot predicts whether you’ll give that brew a thumbs up—or down

first_img To make predictions, the researchers used two types of data. First, as RoboBEER poured, it measured 15 beer attributes including bubble size, beer color, gas release, and foam height and stability. Second, people’s faces were videotaped as they watched the beer videos. Artificial intelligence (AI) analyzed the videos to measure biometric factors such as pupil dilation, heart rate, and emotional expression. For each viewer, the researchers fed 28 pieces of RoboBEER and biometric data into a neural network—another AI algorithm—to see whether the data correlated with the person’s conscious ratings.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The neural network could predict whether someone liked a beer’s foam height with about 80% accuracy, the team reports in Food Control. In unpublished work, the team has found that an AI with just the RoboBEER data can predict a beer’s likability—as rated in sipping sessions by consumers or even connoisseurs—with about 90% accuracy. And it doesn’t need a designated driver. iStock.com/doug4537 By Matthew HutsonMay. 30, 2018 , 9:45 AM As we pawn more and more jobs off on robots, there are a few you’d think we’d keep for ourselves, like beer taster. But brewers often need an automated way to ensure product quality, and a research team in Australia has developed a cheap method to help them. Their latest study assesses a freshly poured beer’s frothy top. Why focus on the bubbles? Because foam affects people’s enjoyment of beer and sparkling wine even more than taste and aroma do.To gauge people’s reactions to beer foam, the researchers needed a consistent way to produce the foam, so they employed RoboBEER, a robot they’d previously built out of Lego pieces that pours beer from bottles into a glass. They showed videos of these robo-pours to people and asked them several questions about how they liked the height and stability of the foam, as well as the beer’s clarity and overall perceived quality. The goal was to be able to show people a video and predict these ratings without a long—or any—questionnaire, and without having to serve any actual beer, which slows the evaluation process even more. Beer-slinging robot predicts whether you’ll give that brew a thumbs up—or downlast_img read more

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U.S. lawmakers move to protect historic Chaco Canyon from mining and drilling

first_img iStock.com/kojihirano Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico U.S. lawmakers move to protect historic Chaco Canyon from mining and drilling Originally published by GreenwireAppropriators in the U.S. House of Representatives would ensure federal lands around Chaco Canyon in New Mexico are protected from new energy and mineral development.The House Appropriations Committee released a report to accompany its Interior-EPA bill up for markup tomorrow (E&E News PM, 14 May).Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) By Kellie Lunney, E&E NewsMay. 21, 2019 , 3:25 PM Language in the report would prevent the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from leasing or proposing new leases within a 10-mile radius of Chaco Culture National Historical Park.The fiscal 2020 language is additional insurance against any oil and gas leasing around Chaco, home to countless ancient ruins and artifacts and the cultural center for Ancestral Puebloans.Earlier this month, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals concluded that BLM has improperly relied on an outdated environmental review to support development of thousands of northeastern New Mexico wells projected in a 2014 “reasonably foreseeable development scenario” (Energywire, 8 May).Green groups and the New Mexico congressional delegation cheered the decision, considered a victory for protecting the sacred region of Chaco.In February, BLM deferred roughly 1,500 acres it was considering offering in a 28 March oil and natural gas lease sale within 10 miles of the park, the third time the Trump administration has made such a move. BLM and the Bureau of Indian Affairs currently are working together on an updated management plan for the area.”The Committee further directs the Bureau to prioritize planning updates for the region, increase cultural resources inventories in cooperation with the State of New Mexico and tribes to ensure well-informed land management decisions, and engage in meaningful government-to-government consultation with tribes, including conducting ethnographic studies outside of the 10-mile radius,” the spending bill report said.New Mexico lawmakers, including Democratic Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, reintroduced legislation in April that would establish a 10-mile buffer around the Chaco Culture National Historical Park and ban new drilling or mineral extraction from the protected federal lands. It would not apply to minerals in the area owned by private, state or tribal entities.Udall is the ranking member of the Senate Interior and Environment Appropriations Subcommittee, so the language is likely to show up in the Senate’s Interior spending bill.Late last month, New Mexico State Land Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard stopped further oil and natural gas development on New Mexico trust lands near Chaco.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2019. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.netPast coverage on ScienceInsider:Drilling boom threatens web of ancient roads in Southwest Read more…last_img read more

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Top stories: A new kind of hair ‘ID,’ healing broken bird wings, and double dipping NIH researchers

first_img(Left to right): TIMOTHY EVANS/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; STEPHAN SCHMITZ/FOLIO ART; SCRATCHART/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM Ultrasensitive protein method lets scientists ID someone from a single strand of hairA new forensic technique could have criminals—and some prosecutors—tearing their hair out: Researchers have developed a method they say can identify a person from as little as 1 centimeter of a single strand of hair—and that is eight times more sensitive than similar protein analysis techniques. If the new method ever makes it into the courtroom, it could greatly expand the ability to identify the people at the scene of a crime.Dog bones could help patch broken bird wingsSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)A broken wing can be deadly for a bird, not to mention heartbreaking for the person who finds the creature flopping on the ground. Now, researchers have developed a new treatment for injured birds using a surprising material: the bones of sheep and dogs.Investigation reveals widespread double dipping in NIH program to pay off school debtSince 1988, the National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program has aimed to keep promising young biomedical scientists in academic research by helping repay school loans that can run up to hundreds of thousands of dollars. Without it, supporters say, many of these researchers might have chosen lucrative slots at pharmaceutical companies or in private practice. But a Science investigation reveals that many of these researchers are breaking the program’s often-changing rules by double dipping—accepting thousands of dollars of industry money even as U.S. tax dollars pay off their student loans.Here’s a better way to convert dog years to human years, scientists sayFollowing the long-debunked but still popular idea that one dog year equals seven human years, a 2-year-old pup would be 14, and a 14-year-old dog would be almost a centenarian. Now, researchers say they have a new formula to convert dog years to human years—one with some actual science behind it. Follow the link to calculate your own pup’s age in dog years.Bangladesh could be the first to cultivate Golden Rice, genetically altered to fight blindnessSoon. That has long been scientists’ answer when asked about the approval of Golden Rice, a genetically modified (GM) crop that could help prevent childhood blindness and deaths in the developing world. Ever since Golden Rice first made headlines nearly 20 years ago, it has been a flashpoint in debates over GM crops. Now, Bangladesh appears about to become the first country to approve Golden Rice for planting. Top stories: A new kind of hair ‘ID,’ healing broken bird wings, and double dipping NIH researcherscenter_img By Eva FrederickNov. 22, 2019 , 3:05 PMlast_img read more

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Punjab Deputy CM Sukhbir Badal gets SRK to dance at inauguration of the Kabaddi World Cup

first_imgShah Rukh KhanIt was to be his grand sporting spectacle before the greatest sport of them all, elections. But it has backfired.Punjab Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Badal got Shah Rukh Khan to dance at the inauguration of the Kabaddi World Cup in Bathinda. But the hefty price tag, a reported,Shah Rukh KhanIt was to be his grand sporting spectacle before the greatest sport of them all, elections. But it has backfired.Punjab Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Badal got Shah Rukh Khan to dance at the inauguration of the Kabaddi World Cup in Bathinda. But the hefty price tag, a reported Rs 2.8 crore including the cost of a chartered flight for the star, has caused widespread anger. Sukhbir’s cousin, Manpreet Singh Badal of the Peoples’ Party of Punjab, attacked the timing of the event, launched on the day the anti-Sikh riots in 1984 began. His chief rival, Punjab Congress chief Amarinder Singh, also called attention to the presence of the sartorially-challenged dancers on stage.last_img read more

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Amma’s purge

first_imgBehind the high walls of Poes Garden the politics of Tamil Nadu is decided – at least when Jayalalithaa is in power. But, few have any idea of what happens in that mysterious garden.From being the residence of a popular actor of yesteryears, it has turned into a virtual iron curtain ever since she stepped into the shoes of her mentor MGR and more so after being catapulted as chief minister in 1991.No wonder that it presents itself as a house of intrigues – evoking curiosity but allowing little or no information to find its way to the outside world.Unless summoned, it remains out of bounds even for party leaders and ministers not to speak of the ordinary AIADMK worker.So much so that ‘Garden’ in the political discourse and administrative lexicon of the state evokes awe and fear. Though located in the heart of the city and sporting a modern look, few would disagree that it functions on the lines of a medieval fortress.In the absence of any attempt to reach out and demystify the widely held public perception, the recent purge of V K Sasikala and her cabal has reinforced it further. For, it is no ordinary disciplinary action against errant party functionaries that could be swept under the carpet. At one stroke, the diva has banished her all-weather friend of three decades and 13 of her relatives, known as the ‘Mannargudi Mafia’.Ever since she entered the ‘Garden’ in 1991, Sasikala remains separated from her husband, M Natarajan, and has been living under the same roof with her spinster friend. She even went public on dumping her surname so as to prove that she has no relations with her husband.advertisementAPART from detractors and critics, party leaders who were marginalised attributed their fall from grace to this lady. Sasikala, who came from a modest background, hails from Mannargudi in Triuvarur district of the Cauvery delta region. Interestingly, it is the native district of DMK patriarch M Karunanidhi as well. But, there ends the similarity.For the unsuspecting, she is the villain along with her clan fattening parasites, who have spun an evil web around Jayalalithaa. Well, it is always easy to find a scapegoat! Reinforcing this is saffron ideologue Cho S Ramaswamy, for whom the Sasikala clan was an extra- constitutional authority interfering in the party and government.After initial hesitation, the Thuglak editor has acknowledged his role in this ‘course correction’or ‘ethnic cleansing’. But, he considers himself as a friend being looked upon for wise counsel.There are others who share similar views but with a difference. For them, Jayalalithaa has misplaced her trust. “Earlier, she was accessible and used to meet people. There was absolutely no hindrance. Things drastically changed after the arrival of Sasikala into the Garden. Somehow, Jayalalithaa was unable to wriggle out and remained a prisoner of circumstances,” says columnist and writer Solai, who had mentored her during the days of MGR. In his view, the purge was too late but nevertheless a welcome one.Every AIADMK stalwart who was either chased out or forced to leave the party blames the ‘Mannargudi Mafia’. From the Garden only orders would come which have to be complied with without questioning. Any indiscretion either by babus or party satraps would invite wrath.”When I raised this, no one listened. Had my warnings been heeded, things would not have come to such a pass and I would not have quit the party,” was the reaction of N Jothi, the former legal eagle for Jayalalithaa, who had been looking after her court cases.Though the diva told him that Sasikala was a mere household assistant not to be wary of, he had no other option but to leave and take refuge in the DMK.Well everyone has a tale of woes. But, this one is different. Enamoured by the Brahmin leadership of a Dravidian party, popular comedian and film actor S Ve Shekher joined the AIADMK with high hopes only to see them vanish into thin air within months.As a Brahmin having a place in the public domain, he had direct access to the diva. To his shock and surprise, he found himself ostracised within the party and his direct link too getting snapped.”I realised that the Garden has become an iron curtain. None could reach the leader without the knowledge of Sasikala who could not tolerate anyone getting closer to Jayalalithaa. I was loyal to Amma but sadly even my letters have not reached her and this I had found out only very late,” bemoans the comedian.advertisementIn his reasoning the diva has just started cleansing the stables. “Still 300 or more would have to be weeded out. Or else, the virus would sneak in and spread its tentacles,” he says.But, will the purge usher in a new life or simply pave the way for another clique in the Garden? Already murmurs are there that a Mylapore variant is all set to replace the Mannargudi Mafia!  ===Cong faces ‘Stalinist’opposition from ally M K StalinDespite being allies, they are at daggers drawn! In the aftermath of the 2G scam, not only there is trust deficit between the Congress and the DMK but the latter finds it unpalatable to be in the company of the former.The disenchantment finds expression more frequently than ever in the context of the Mullaperiyar dam dispute with Kerala. While DMK patriarch M Karunanidhi is not for upsetting the applecart, his younger son and heir-apparent M K Stalin is least interested in continuing the alliance. Considering the national party as a spent force, he is of the view that carrying a dead wood would only be detrimental to the DMK’s interests.”It is hurting us rather than being a source of help. Moreover, the assembly and civic polls have clearly shown that the Congress has little relevance in state politics. How long should we be palanquin bearers?” was his poser aired in the party fora.In his opinion, in the wake of the Mullaperiyar row the Congress has lost even the little support it had in five southern districts. And he is not wrong. For, though the Congress represents three Lok Sabha seats in this region, it has not sprung to the defence of the farmers whose wrath was directed at J M Haroon, whose office was ransacked during an agitation. Stalin may be correct in his assessment but will Karunanidhi be prepared to give up even the fig leaf of support that the party has at the Centre?  ===Home state offers no solace to beleaguered Chidambaram P ChidambaramAt a time when Union Home Minister P Chidambaram’s cup of woes is overflowing, he is finding no vocal support in his home turf.More than his detractors in the Opposition, Congress factions in Tamil Nadu are gleeful at his discomfiture. If the DMK had relished his name being dragged into the 2G scam earlier, now it is the turn of those from the Congress ranks. But, for fear of inviting the wrath of the high command, they guard against going public.With Chidambaram having lost face in his native Sivaganga where the Congress failed to put up a decent show in the civic poll, his isolation is getting accentuated. The lone voice of support comes from his Cabinet colleague G K Vasan, heading the dominant faction in the state. But, nothing much could be read into it apart from mere words of solidarity as no tears are shed for him. ===Nobody wants to be a minister advertisementM K AlagiriIt appears the DMK isn’t concerned about ministerial berths anymore. For, there is no clamour for claiming replacements for A Raja and Dayanidhi Maran and the party too seems to be once bitten twice shy.It is not as though the party has no interest in holding onto power. For, none can forget the party driving a hard bargain with the Congress to retain plum portfolios in the past.With the release of Kanimozhi on bail in the 2G case, there was expectation that DMK president M Karunanidhi would secure his favourite daughter a slot in the Union Cabinet to accord her some prominence. Her supporters even claimed that the patriarch was keeping it only to accommodate her. With a studied silence, the old man of Gopalapuram had scotched all such rumours.As of now, the thinking in the DMK is that getting replacements for the two slots would in no way enhance the party’s image or work towards its interests. Further, it would also open up old wounds within the Karunanidhi clan giving a fresh headache to the octogenarian.No wonder that the patriarch is playing it safe and avoiding unnecessary trouble. Well, this leaves the DMK’s southern strongman M K Alagiri as the lone representative in the Cabinet, though he finds the going tough in the national capital.last_img read more

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Quattrochi siphoned off India’s money, Sonia Gandhi owes moral explanations: Advani

first_imgBuzz of the WeekWhile merit and seniority are the accepted criteria for the appointment of the cabinet secretary, other factors have come into play this time. More than one hopeful is flaunting connections with 10 Janpath, leading to inexplicable delay. “The RSS has maintained it can do business with the,Buzz of the WeekWhile merit and seniority are the accepted criteria for the appointment of the cabinet secretary, other factors have come into play this time. More than one hopeful is flaunting connections with 10 Janpath, leading to inexplicable delay.”The RSS has maintained it can do business with the Congress. What is left unsaid is that the BJP can support the Congress if they discard the Left.” Sitaram Yechury, CPI(M) Politburo member”Dawood is involved in the Mumbai blasts, Quattrochi siphoned off the country’s money. The Congress president owes moral and political explanations.” L.K. Advani, leader of the Opposition”The Congress has earmarked quotas for Muslims in jobs and education to get their votes.” Rajnath Singh, BJP president”The whole social sector is skewed in favour of the urban elite. That is responsible for our poor performance in the Commonwealth Games.” Mani Shankar Aiyar, sports minister”At 33, if I am forced to come out and play a (Davis Cup) singles match, that is something we definitely have got to look into.” Leander Paes, tennis playerlast_img read more

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India vs Sri Lanka: Dilshan’s unlucky No. is 160

first_imgCall it fate or bad omen, but Tillakaratne Dilshan would be hoping that he never ever gets 160 runs on board.For today Sri Lanka lost the Hobart ODI even though the opener and former Sri Lankan captain scored put on an impressive 160 not out on board.Call is bizarre, but the last time he scored the same figure – 160 (scorecard), Sri Lanka ended up losing the match. And the opponents were the same – India.He did that at the Madhavrao Scindia Cricket Ground in Rajkot on December 15, 2009, when Sri Lanka were touring India.India scored a massive 414 in the first ODI of the series, thanks to an impressive 146 by Virender Sehwag.In reply Sri Lanka got off to a rollicking start with opener Dilshan scoring a 186-ball 160. But, the end result proved to be a forgettable one for the islanders as they fell short by just three runs in their chase.Eventually, India ended up winning the five-match series 3-1, with the Ferozeshah Kotla match being abandoned on account of unfit pitch.Today history repeated itself at a different venue (Hobart), different continent and at a different time zone. India were playing Sri Lanka. This time the Lankans put on a stiff target of 321 with Dilshan scoring an identical 160 – the end result, whoever, was – India beat Sri Lanka by seven wickets.Here’s what the tarot card says about the Number 16:The Tower tarot card sits at number 16.Throughout our lives we all strive to obtain and retain a sense of self and individual identity.  This starts at The Emperor and our feeling of I Am. We draw people, places and things to us that help us to maintain what we believe to be our identity.  Piece by piece, brick by brick, we build this ego personality, which here in the Tower is represented by the Tower itself.advertisementThen something happens that shatters our illusions and the Tower crumbles – That’s what happened to Dilshan today.last_img read more

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DDCA chief Arun Jaitley’s name plate removed from Kotla

first_imgThe name plate of Delhi and District Cricket Association (DDCA) president Arun Jaitley was removed from his room at the Ferozeshah Kotla on Thursday following allegations that the room was being misused in his absence.The room, incidentally, has been shared by Jaitley and DDCA vice-president C.K. Khanna for many years and is opened only when the occupants visit the DDCA headquarters.The issue of the misuse of the room came up during a stormy meeting of the DDCA executive committee. The issue led to a heated debate between senior members. “There have been allegations that liquor was being served in the room when Mr Jaitley was not around. Liquor is anyway not allowed to be served outside the bar at the Kotla,” said a source in the DDCA.”The issue became so hot that it led to arguments between some members, and eventually the name plate of Mr Jaitley was removed from Room No. 1 at the Kotla,” he said. “It is, however, not known if it was removed with the consent of Mr Jaitley or not.”Both Jaitley and Khanna could not be reached for comment. Khanna did not pick up his mobile phone while an aide of Jaitley said that since he was packing for a foreign trip, he could not take the call.At the meeting, Jaitley is said to have announced that henceforth no liquor will be served outside the bar, called Inswinger.last_img read more

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Azkals forge tie with Yemenis, inch closer toward AFC Asian Cup slot

first_imgFILE  Photo by: Tristan Tamayo/Inquirer.netSummoning its old, fighting form, the Philippines moved within a whisker of an AFC Asian Cup spot after salvaging a 1-1 draw with Yemen Tuesday night at Al Wakrah Stadium in Doha, Qatar.For the second straight game, the Azkals needed a late goal to secure a point against the Yemenis as Mike Ott struck in the 89th minute to keep the Filipinos in pole position in Group F, where the top two sides will qualify for the tournament in the United Arab Emirates in 2019.ADVERTISEMENT With four regular starters out due to injuries, Dooley tinkered with his lineup, giving JPV Marikina defender Sean Kane a surprise start at central defense, while Davao Aguilas’ Simone Rota returned from injury and Daisuke Sato regained his leftback spot.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges View comments Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim MOST READ Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans CIMB Classic: Pagunsan assured of P.65 millioncenter_img Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors LATEST STORIES “We’re going to close the deal in Nepal,” vowed Azkals coach Thomas Dooley. “We came here to win, but at least we didn’t lose. We’re very happy with the point.”“The team didn’t deserve to go home with a loss. The spirit was great, the preparation was great for this game. I’m actually satisfied overall.”Tawfik Ali put Yemen ahead with an opportunistic strike in the 63rd minute after the Azkals failed to clear a corner.The Azkals quickly brought more men forward with little effect until substitute Junior Muñoz showed grit and determination as he marauded down the right and cut the ball back for Phil Younghusband, who took a touch for Mulders.Ott managed to stay onside before showing composure to finish as the Azkals found the equalizer right at the death.ADVERTISEMENT The Azkals struggled to break down the Yemenis for most of the match until Ott, who plays for Angthong United in the Thai second division, got on the end of a clever ball from Paul Mulders and beat Mohammad Ayash at his near post for the equalizer.The result increased the Azkals’ tally to eight points, two ahead of Tajikistan and Yemen, which play against each other in November in Dushanbe.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThe Azkals can seal qualification in the continent’s showpiece tournament with a victory over Nepal in Kathmandu on Nov. 14.With only a point to show from its first four matches, the Nepalese are virtually out of the running for an AFC Cup berth. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PHlast_img read more

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Deflated Ball: Blake gets 29 in Clips’ 108-92 rout of Lakers

first_imgWinter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans Loss to Pirates only motivates Red Lions Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Los Angeles Lakers center Brook Lopez, left, and guard Lonzo Ball, right, reach for a loose ball along with Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES — Patrick Beverley crowded chest-to-chest with Lonzo Ball before an inbounds pass in the first quarter while they were 94 feet from the basket. Moments later at midcourt, Beverley emphatically fouled the Lakers’ rookie point guard and watched him fall.Ball still might turn out to be Los Angeles’ basketball star of the future, even after his awfully quiet NBA debut.ADVERTISEMENT “We got blown out, so I didn’t play too well,” Ball said. “It was great to start out, but all I care about is winning, and we lost today. We’ve got to regroup.”Ball is expected to revitalize his hometown team this season, but the rookie started out with all the nerves and mistakes that might be expected from any 19-year-old with the weight of a 16-time NBA championfranchise on his slender shoulders.Beverley, who joined the Clippers in Paul’s trade to the Rockets, had 10 points while introducing Ball to high-level NBA defense.“I just had to set the tone,” Beverley said. “I told him after the game, due to all the riff-raff his dad brings, he’s going to get a lot of people coming at him. He has to be ready for that, and I let him know after the game. But what a better way to start him off. I was 94 feet guarding him tonight. Welcome his little young ass to the NBA.”Along with a handful of good-looking passes and a 3-pointer late in the first half, Ball went 1 for 6 from ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LATEST STORIES Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors The present in this town still belongs to the Clippers, even without Chris Paul.Blake Griffin scored 29 points and DeAndre Jordan added 14 points and 24 rebounds in the Clippers’ 108-92rout of the Lakers on Thursday night.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingLou Williams added 12 points in the Clippers’ first game since Paul spurned the perennial playoff team after six years and forced an offseason trade to Houston. The Clippers will have a new look this season after adding Beverley’s tenacity and several new scorers, but they were still miles ahead of their Staples Center co-tenants in both teams’ season openers.Beverley and the Clippers got little trouble from Ball, who had three points, four assists and nine rebounds in 29 minutes during the first game for the No. 2 overall pick from UCLA. He had about 40 friends and family members in the stands, including his voluble father, LaVar. UP NEXTClippers: Host Suns on Saturday.Lakers: At Suns on Friday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Palace: Robredo back to ‘groping with a blind vision’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games the field and committed two turnovers.“He’s going to be a great talent, but he has to go through the tough times,” Beverley said. “He’llappreciate this when he looks back on it.”Brook Lopez scored 20 points in his debut for the Lakers, and Jordan Clarkson added 18.“I wasn’t happy with what we gave our fans tonight,” Lakers coach Luke Walton said. “Obviously I heard the (boos), and we deserved it at those times.”TIP-INSClippers: Danilo Gallinari had 11 points in his LA debut. … Coach Doc Rivers answered back at Paul, who said he didn’t like the Clippers’ team culture in a documentary that will be released this week by ESPN.“Listen, when you leave, you should just leave,” Rivers said. “I don’t think you have to try to burn the house down or justify why you left. That’s what I would say to it. I like our culture.Lakers: New G Kentavious Caldwell-Pope missed this game while beginning a two-game suspension for getting arrested in March and later pleading guilty to operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated. … Kyle Kuzma, the Lakers’ other first-round pick, had eight points in his NBA debut. … Andrew Bogut, the former Golden State center, had three fouls and three turnovers in his Lakers debut.NEW BACKCOURTEven with several new contributors, the Clippers already resemble a hard-nosed, tough-minded veteran team led by Beverley. Milos Teodosic, the other starting guard in Rivers’ revamped lineup, hit two 3-pointers in the 30-year-old Serbian rookie’s NBA debut.MAGIC BALLIt was a busy night for Lakers executive Magic Johnson, also a co-owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Magic watched from the tunnel while Staples Center showed Game 5 of the NL Championship Series on the scoreboard during pregame warmups, and he celebrated behind the scenes when the Dodgers clinched their first World Series berth since 1988 during the first half. “I’m just happy for all the players and all the Dodger fans across the world,” Johnson said. “This is a moment that I’ll never forget. I was torn, because I wanted to be here for Lonzo Ball’s first game as a Laker, but my heart is in Chicago. … I’m so happy with Clayton Kershaw, that he can finally pitch in the World Series. He deserves this moment, and all our players deserve this moment, too.” Staples Center erupted in cheers when the Dodgers recorded the final out in Chicago, and again when the final out appeared on the video board. Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse chargeslast_img read more

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Rookie Nambatac gets major role as Rain or Shine deals with injuries

first_imgAfter 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Rain or Shine rookie Rey Nambatac. Photo from PBA.phRain or Shine head coach Caloy Garcia said he is entrusting rookie Rey Nambatac with a major role to start the new PBA season with the Elasto Painters dealing with injuries to several of their key players.Nambatac is among the players Garcia is expecting to fill the void as the likes of Jericho Cruz, Jireh Ibañes, Jay Washington and Raymond Almazan recover from their respective injuries.ADVERTISEMENT “Basically, he just has to adjust to his teammates and in facing bigger players,” Garcia added.Garcia also knows the caliber of a player the Painters got in Nambatac.“We also know what kind of quality we’re gonna get. He’s a scorer, he’s a good slasher.”ADVERTISEMENT View comments The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Malditas save PH from shutoutcenter_img “The only new acquisition that we have is Rey Nambatac. The only thing that we’re worried about right now is we still have five to six players recovering from injuries,” Garcia told INQUIRER.net.“We’re depleted right now and he’s going to get his time at the beginning of the season.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingNambatac was the seventh pick in the 2017 PBA Draft and one of the reasons why the Painters wanted him was his familiarity with Garcia.“He is quick to adjust because he played for me before,” said Garcia, who coached Nambatac during their time with the Letran Knights for two years. “He knows what kind of coach I am and I know what kind of player he is.” Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 Column: Boxing tries to appeal to the masses once again ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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6-time champion Djokovic unsure of playing Australian Open

first_img‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View comments LATEST STORIES Kei Nishikori out of Australian Open because wrist not ready Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Since winning his fourth consecutive Grand Slam title at the 2016 French Open — becoming the first man in nearly a half-century with four in a row — Djokovic has made it past the quarterfinals at only one of the past six major tournaments, finishing as the runner-up at the 2016 U.S. Open.A year ago at the Australian Open, as the two-time defending champion, he bowed out in the second round against 117th-ranked Denis Istomin, the first time Djokovic exited so early at any major in nearly a decade. PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH FILE – In this Jan. 19, 2017, file photo, Serbia’s Novak Djokovic makes a backhand return to Uzbekistan’s Denis Istomin during their second round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia. Dkokovic is still not sure whether he will be able to play in the Australian Open, where has won six of his 12 major championships. Djokovic has been dealing with pain in his right elbow. A statement posted on his website Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2017, says he will travel to Australia to participate in two exhibition events next week. After that, the statement says, “the decision will be made about his participation at the first Grand Slam of the season.”(AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)Novak Djokovic is still not sure whether he will be able to play in the Australian Open, where he has won six of his 12 major championships.Djokovic has been dealing with pain in his right elbow. A statement posted on his website on Wednesday says he will travel to Australia to participate in two exhibition events there next week.ADVERTISEMENT Djokovic hasn’t played in any tournament since retiring from his match in the Wimbledon quarterfinals in July because of the elbow injury. At the time, he acknowledged that his right arm had been bothering him for more than a year but that he had decided against having surgery.The extended absence dropped the former No. 1 player to No. 12 in the current ATP rankings.Djokovic is hardly alone when it comes to high-profile men’s tennis players dealing with injuries as the new season begins.Top-ranked Rafael Nadal, the runner-up to Roger Federer at the Australian Open last year, withdrew from this week’s Brisbane International tuneup tournament because of a bothersome right knee. Nadal won the French Open and U.S. Open in 2017 to raise his major count to 16.Three-time major champion Andy Murray, meanwhile, also pulled out of the Brisbane International and is considering having an operation because of a bad hip. Like Djokovic, he last competed at Wimbledon, nearly six months ago.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thais After that, the statement says, “the decision will be made about his participation at the first Grand Slam of the season.”Djokovic, who is right-handed, cited the elbow problem on Dec. 30, when he withdrew from this week’s Qatar Open, a hard-court tuneup tournament for the Australian Open.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingThat was supposed to be the 30-year-old Serb’s final competitive preparation before play begins in Melbourne on Jan. 15.He previously pulled out of a United Arab Emirates exhibition tournament. MOST READ BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusiveslast_img read more

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